Additional Flock Stuff

Some additional links regarding Flock –

Wired story

Flock advertises itself as a "social browser," meaning that the application plays nicely with popular web services like Flickr, Technorati and del.icio.us. Flock also features widely compliant WYSIWYG, drag-and-drop blogging tools. The browser even promises to detect and authenticate all those user accounts automatically. It’s a clear attempt to be the browser of choice for the Web 2.0 user.

It’s no coincidence that the buzz has built rapidly to a rolling boil. Blogger and tech pundit Robert Scoble simply calls it "awesome." Given the recent swell of anticipation surrounding Flock, the preceding stealth period seems quaint by contrast. Since an August demo at Bar Camp, enthusiastic blog posts have amounted to love letters in their enthusiasm.

A Flock review

I’ve been beta-testing it for a while now, and it’s excellent for a still-private beta. It’s not my default browser because it doesn’t yet play nicely with the Firefox extensions I’ve become used to (it will – but not yet), but with work, I could see me using it all day, every day. This glowing story from Wired is largely accurate. That said – from the moment I first started playing with Flock I expected and having been watching for a more nuanced conversation to develop around it, since Flock is a direct competitor to Firefox.


Blog post from Flock CEO about open source and Flock  –

In recent weeks, several folks have asked why Flock is building a browser, not an extension, and about our relationship to the Mozilla community.  Let me try to address some of these questions.

A list of discussions (check the comments and trackbacks)